JDX is Going Greener & Getting Fitter!

          September 4, 2019

          VICTORIA WALKER

          Having featured on the Times Fast Track 100 twice and grown to a workforce of over 700 people, JDX has rapidly become one of the UK’s fastest growing companies… 

          At JDX, we don’t want this to equate to rapid growth in our carbon footprint. We’re committed to promoting better awareness of our carbon emissions as well as managing and reducing them.

          In light of this, our Carbon Accounting Team have been working on an estimation of the carbon footprint of JDX London. Today, we’re sharing our findings in anticipation of tomorrow’s ‘Go Green, Get Fit Challenge’ which our Green Society are hosting tomorrow. Read on to see how you can make a difference!

          The first step towards Carbon Accounting JDX was to define the boundary of the organisation’s carbon footprint; with 95% of JDXers working on client site, this could be interpreted in a number of ways. For the purpose of this study, we looked into the carbon footprint of JDX’s Head Office in London.

          Our JDX Carbon Accounting Team have identified the main emission points from JDX. These include: Business and Commuter Travel; indirect energy from the building, and resources consumed at HQ. With help from the Finance Department, we were able to collect business travel and resources data for the FY2018. We used a survey sent out to all London staff to collect data on employee commuter travel. Unfortunately, we were not able to estimate the emissions produced from the building energy consumption due to lack of access to the utility bills.

          Our team estimated that in the FY2018, JDX’s Carbon Footprint was roughly 255.30 tonnes of Co2. For reference, this means that to offset this amount, we would require 258 acres of forest.

          Our daily commutes to work made up 50% of these carbon emissions. Reducing this number is one of the key goals of JDX’s Green Society. Tomorrow, JDX London will host the first of its ‘Go Green, Get Fit’ challenges. Our London JDXers will be travelling to work in the most environmentally friendly way possible; with prizes up for grabs for those who are able to reduce their carbon footprint by the most and a celebratory breakfast awaiting all challengers at Head Quarters, we’re expecting huge successes!

          The Go Green, Get Fit challenge is just one of the many ways JDX employees can reduce their carbon footprint. We host regular seminars to promote a healthier lifestyle, more responsible procurement and better waste management as well as sustainability focused charity days. Our bike-to-work scheme offers a fantastic way for JDXers to travel green, and we’re constantly coming up with new schemes to make a difference. Our Green Society is growing rapidly globally, and we’re proud to support such an important cause.

          Laura Muriel, James Poyner, Monika Meskautiwe and Matt Doyle head up our London Green Society, so please do reach out to them if you want to get involved. Or even better, you can come up with your own carbon reducing initiatives! The Go Green society is as a platform for the JDX community to reduce its carbon footprint, so use it!

          “This is not what we hope or we think ought to happen, it’s what can happen!” – Lord Debden, The Committee on Climate Change chairman.

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